Fremont County Emergency Management has scheduled a 7 p.m. meeting today at the Hamburg Fire House regarding Missouri River flooding that is being described as “imminent.”



Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Crecelius is encouraging residents in flood-prone areas to make plans ahead of time and start moving stuff.

The meeting focus is on properties on the south end of Hamburg, but anyone with flooding concerns may attend.



The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is reporting that releases from upstream reservoirs is reaching record high levels.


Fremont County Emergency Management has scheduled a 7 p.m. meeting today at the Hamburg Fire House regarding Missouri River flooding that is being described as “imminent.”

Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Crecelius is encouraging residents in flood-prone areas to make plans ahead of time and start moving stuff.
The meeting focus is on properties on the south end of Hamburg, but anyone with flooding concerns may attend.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is reporting that releases from upstream reservoirs is reaching record high levels.

Raised levels are forecast for the Nebraska City area by June 7, but some residents are report being told that the river will not crest until mid-June.

“Protecting lives is our number one priority right now,” said Brig. Gen. John McMahon, commander of the Northwest Division of the corps of engineers. “We are working closely with state and local emergency management teams to identify potential flood areas and provide residents with the most current information.”

Dale Thummel, who lives a mile east and 1.5 miles south of the Sapp Brothers Truck Stop, said he received a telephone call Monday advising him to evacuate.
He said water in 1993 was running eight feet from his house, but higher flows are being forecast now.

“It almost run me out of here in 1993 until the levy broke down south, otherwise it would have,” he said.

Thummel, a 49-year-old truck driver, said he is busy today moving everything out.
His closest neighbor, about a two miles away, is also evacuating.

Thummel said the flooding in 1993 was due mostly because a nearby creek had no where to drain and there was seeping from the water table below the ground.

“This time they say it's going to be the river,” he said.  “They are telling everyone on the bottom they have to evacuate and it's going to be longterm.”